November 20th, 2003

Drag

This morning..

The show went magnificent. Near perfect, at least at what we could achieve as a bunch of amateurs without experience, with little time, limited funds and good intentions. We had a running start with two of us welcoming the guests into the theatre. Basically the show started with the doors opening. We knew it worked during our word of welcome. As a parody on a current TV-commercial we welcomed the audience in three languages. Halfway through the Turkish welcome we got our first round of applause. Nobody understood what she said, yet they enjoyed it. In the second scene, a choir singing a song, backstage some of us were dancing. Literally, instead of having the nerves buck you, they tried ballroom dancing.

We did ten scenes on stage, with 8 video bits in between. Both were well worked out, had a continuous thought behind them. Most sketches went well; the ballet by 5 men in tutu was a huge hit. Because of the hilarious act, they didn’t need to be funny, so they tried really well, though a ballet by men with strings can, by definition, never be taken seriously.

I had two tiny roles on stage, both went well. Next to that I had a more important task, rebuilding the stage between sketches, together with 3 others. Quick, yet quiet, not an easy combination. Apart from some tiny mistakes, not noticed by anybody but ourselves.

More important though was that I wrote quite a bit of what happened on stage. The ideas for 9 out of 10 scenes were done by a team of 3 three quarters of a year ago. I was one of them. I actually wrote the lines for nearly half of them and adapted some of two others. It is quite satisfying that you see your ideas performed on a stage. You hear your jokes go down well with the crowd. You see people play a role that was thought out ages ago, whereas they think they came up with a lot themselves.

There were at least over 800 there watching us. They seemed to enjoy themselves a lot. We got plenty of laughs, had to stop telling our lines sometimes because of the applause or the laughter, which obviously didn’t happen during the rehearsals. In the finale we all came back up and sang the chorus of one song. We got a huge standing ovation, it was brilliant. Afterwards we had colleagues and strangers coming up to us telling us how much they had enjoyed it. We were buzzing for hours. What a great day!
  • Current Music
    QI on BBC2